Things You Should Do To Keep Your Job

One of the statements I hear from unemployed job seekers time and time again is to do everything you can to keep your current employment unless you’re ready to move on and have a new position lined up.

If you’re dissatisfied at work, have a look at these suggestions for how to keep your job before submitting your resignation. You don’t have to stay indefinitely, but if you can, you should try to stay at least until you find another job because it’s more difficult to get work when you’re unemployed.

Make an effort to make the job work. Is there anything you could change to make the job work better? Is it possible to request a transfer or a shift change? Is there anything that could sway your opinion and persuade you to stay?

 

 

Work assiduously.

Most companies don’t mind if you spend a little time on Facebook or texting, but make sure you focus on your work and give your boss the time you’re paid for. When it comes to layoffs, if the company needs to make a decision, your employer will keep the most productive staff.

 

Ascertain that you are one of them.

Installing a Facebook blocker on your browser will make it more difficult to view the website if spending too much time on it is your main vice. Both Google Chrome and Apple have a couple of apps that are very good at limiting your Facebook usage.

 

Always arrive on time.

Employees who are late to work, take a long lunch break, use a lot of sick time, and/or depart early every day will not be rewarded by their supervisor. Instead of making excuses for why you can’t be at work, be on time and present.

If your delay is due to a personal issue, set up a meeting with your manager to explain the circumstance. Inquire if you can stay late to make up for missed time until the problem is resolved. If the situation is urgent enough, most companies will sympathize and be accommodating.

Play well with others. Be the employee who gets along with everyone, doesn’t engage in workplace gossip, and is willing to assist coworkers. A pleasant attitude and friendliness go a long way toward winning your coworkers’ respect and trust. This strategy could potentially increase your job satisfaction and happiness.

 

Be adaptable.

Flexibility might be an important factor in keeping your employment. Consider volunteering if your personal schedule allows when your company needs someone to alter shifts, work weekends, put in some extra, or take on additional jobs.

 

Don’t be a whiner.

Nobody hates complainers, no matter how valid their grievances are. If you don’t like your job, keep in mind that there are plenty of others who would gladly take it. One technique to avoid whining is to express thankfulness by stating, “I receive” rather than “I have” to accomplish anything. You will immediately begin to view the glass half full by changing one word!

Offer to assist. Volunteering for new initiatives, offering to help with projects, and taking on more responsibility are all excellent methods to gain (or preserve) job stability. It will also benefit you because the more jobs outside of your comfort zone you take on, the more you will learn and progress

Separate your social media and professional lives.

Even if you despise your job, keep your feelings to yourself or trusted family and friends. Don’t vent your frustrations on social media since you never know who will read it. That could be enough to cost you your job.

 

Maintain a positive attitude.

A good attitude is contagious and essential for long-term employment retention. On my desk is a Post-it note with Rosanne Cash’s phrase, “Cheerfulness is a choice.” Maintaining a cheerful attitude, especially in the face of adversity, will make your life and that of your coworkers much simpler. Make modest changes to your everyday routine to become more positive if you’re trapped in a negative rut.

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